Yippee Ki-Yay MF (2020): Top Ten Weather and Climate Disruption Events of 2020

Dec 12, 2019 Madrid, Spain,
Stuart Scott, Peter Wadham’s, Paul Beckwith, Peter Fiekowsky

Top Ten Climate Disruption Events of 2020: You ain’t seen nothing yet: Part 1 of 4 // Dec 24, 2020

Where do I even begin? Abrupt climate change disruption accelerated rapidly this year, but was overshadowed in most people’s minds by the coronavirus. There were literally hundreds, thousands even, of extreme weather events and climate disruption events bashing at humanity and our stuff this year.

In this four part series of year-end videos I discuss the top ten weather and climate events of 2020 as picked by the Yale Climate Connections folks. They include:

  • 1) Hottest year on record (or 2nd or third).
  • 2) The Wild 2020 Atlantic hurricane season (30 storms).
  • 3) Record-high atmospheric carbon dioxide levels despite record emissions drop.
  • 4) An apocalyptic wildfire season.
  • 5) Super Typhoon Goni: the strongest landfall inch tropical cyclone on record.
  • 6) Hottest reliably measured temperature on ERth: 130 F (54.4 C) in Death Valley.
  • 7) Most expensive 2020 disaster: Flooding in China causes $32 billion in damage.
  • 8) Near-record low Arctic sea ice.
  • 9) U.S. withdrawal from Paris Accord and election of Joe Biden.
  • 10) A near-record number of global billion-dollar weather disasters.

As bad as this year’s weather and climate disruption has been, it will seem like a tame year in the rearview mirror in only a few short years.

Ref:  The top 10 weather and climate events of a record-setting year.

In an all-around bizarre and largely unpleasant calendar year, extreme weather and climate-related changes contributed to the woes of 2020:  ‘

Calendar year 2020 was an extreme and abnormal year, in so many ways. The global coronavirus pandemic altered people’s lives around the world, as did extreme weather and climate events. Let’s review the year’s top 10 such events’:

By Jeff Masters, PhD, and Dana Nuccitelli, Monday, December 21, 2020
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Top Ten Weather and Climate Disruption Events in 2020: Wreaking Havoc on Humanity: Part 2 of 4
Top Ten Weather and Climate Disruption Events in 2020: Worsening Like a Bat Out of Hell: Part 3 of 4
Yippee Ki-Yay MF (2020): Top Ten Weather and Climate Disruption Events of 2020: Part 4 of 4.
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Ref2:  A brief history of yippee-ki-yay, Angela Tung:

Twenty-five years ago this week, the action movie Die Hard opened and Bruce Willis uttered that famous line.  But where does the yippee-ki-yay part come from? (If you’re more interested in the origins of the second half of that saying, check out this article from Slate.) Let’s break it down.

‘The yip part of yippee is old. It originated in the 15th century and meant “to cheep, as a young bird,” according to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED). The more well-known meaning, to emit a high-pitched bark, came about around 1907, as per the OED, and gained the figurative meaning “to shout; to complain.”
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Please consider donating to support my work. I put a lot of time and effort into researching, studying and producing my videos so that you can learn how quickly our world is changing. Donating does not need a PayPal account, but simply a credit card. Please click here.
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About paulbeckwith

Well known climate science educator; Part-time Geography professor (climatology, oceanography, environmental issues), University of Ottawa. Physicist. Engineer. Master's Degree in Science in Laser Optics, Bachelors of Engineering, in Engineering Physics. Won Association of Professional Engineers of Ontario gold medal. Also interested in investment and start-ups in climate solutions, renewable energy and energy efficiency. Avid chess player, and likes restoring old homes. Married with children.
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