Personal

Some of the other stuff about me…
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Elizabeth May (leader of Canadian Green Party), me, and Andrew Weaver (famous climate modeller):

May_Weaver_me

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3 Responses to Personal

  1. Tim Cass says:

    Hi Paul,

    An important consideration with fire and vegetation when comes to evolution and natural selection is the hypothesis that some plants are selectively flammable in that this is an advantage over its immediate spatial neighbors in that the competition is burned out with the more flammable species resprouting, surviving and dominating. Not far fetched and hypothesized by others in flammable environments such as in Australia by R Mutch in 1970.

    Abstract
    Plant species which have survived fires for tens of thousands of years may not only have selected survival mechanisms, but also inherent flammable properties that contribute to the perpetuation of fire—dependent plant communities. This concept goes by beyond the commonly accepted fire climate—fuel moisture basis of wildland fire occurrence. Plant communities may be ignited accidentally or randomly, but the character of burning is not random. The following hypothesis treats this interaction between fire and the ecosystem: Fire—dependent plant communities burn more readily than non—fire—dependent communities because natural selection has favored development of characteristics that make them more flammable. The hypothesis was experimentally derived following laboratory combustion tests with litter of eucalyptus (Eucalyptus obliqua L’Herit), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.), and tropical hardwood leaves.

    Citing Literature
    Also, considering fire and carbon in this light burning itself could be looked at in a different way than most of us do. Same thing here in southern California with the Genus Adenostoma that pretty much has taken over as the dominant vegetation with its resinous leaves and resprouting ability.

    That’s all and keep up the good and new work on vegetation. Much appreciated.

    Like

  2. Tim Cass says:

    Sent you two versions of fire and natural selection. Second had citation so please use that one. Thanks,

    Tim

    Like

  3. Tim Cass says:

    Fire and Natural Selection

    An important consideration with fire and vegetation when comes to evolution and natural selection is the hypothesis that some plants are selectively flammable in that this is an advantage over its immediate spatial neighbors in that the competition is burned out with the more flammable species resprouting, surviving and dominating. Not far fetched and hypothesized by others in flammable environments such as in Australia by R Mutch in 1970.

    Abstract
    Plant species which have survived fires for tens of thousands of years may not only have selected survival mechanisms, but also inherent flammable properties that contribute to the perpetuation of fire—dependent plant communities. This concept goes by beyond the commonly accepted fire climate—fuel moisture basis of wildland fire occurrence. Plant communities may be ignited accidentally or randomly, but the character of burning is not random. The following hypothesis treats this interaction between fire and the ecosystem: Fire—dependent plant communities burn more readily than non—fire—dependent communities because natural selection has favored development of characteristics that make them more flammable. The hypothesis was experimentally derived following laboratory combustion tests with litter of eucalyptus (Eucalyptus obliqua L’Herit), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws.), and tropical hardwood leaves.

    Citing Literature
    Wildland Fires and Ecosystems‐‐A Hypothesis Robert W. Mutch
    First published: 01 November 1970 https://doi.org/10.2307/1933631

    Also, considering fire and carbon in this light burning itself could be looked at in a different way than most of us do. Same thing here in southern California with the Genus Adenostoma that pretty much has taken over as the dominant vegetation with its resinous leaves and resprouting ability.

    That’s all and keep up the good and new work on vegetation. Much appreciated.

    Like

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